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Clynelish 30 yo 1972 Murray McDavid 46% vs Clynelish 37 yo 1972/2009 The Whisky Exchange ’80 proof’ ‘Ten Years Online’ 46%

A recent discussion: Whisky does not need to be at cask strength to be great. So true. I find it’s the quality of the distillation that matters. And the wood while sort of important, is often found unreasonably hyped up beyond measure. That’s the marketing talk. Why do I think this? Clynelish is a good example of excellent distillate which left to its own devices can produce some stellar whisky:

Clynelish 30 yo 1972 Murray McDavid 46%

 Nose: Absolutely wallowing in rich honeys and thick natural waxes – no petroleum products here, it’s honeycomb and resin all over. Overflowing with yellow tones, pollen, touch of wet clay and damp earthen floors, it feels like a field of bright yellow flowers in the morning. Thick unctuous notes of high quality oils for anointing rather than cooking. Classic, deep, luxurious if rather ‘spilling over its belt’ suggesting a less controlled whisky rather than the chiselled and precise sort of 72 Clynelish. But I think this is an overindulgence all of us can happily live with.

 Palate: Yes. It’s waxy and honeyed and a little earthy but surprise – also with a big citric acid bite. There’s some wet chalky minerals like some fat but dry white wines, that resolve to a mellow yellow again of pollen and sunshine. Wonderfully thick mouthfeel. Packs quite some heat that brings a spicy afterglow. And on to the finish.

 Finish: Long, waxy honeyed but a citric tang persists. Excellent Clynelish. Very little wood, no wine, my kind of whisky.

 

Clynelish 37 yo 1972/2009 The Whisky Exchange ’80 proof’ ‘Ten Years Online’ 46%

 Nose: Ok. We’ve taken a little trip further back on the spectrum. This one remains waxy and honeyed, as all 72s should really be, but less so instead this one is one of the more chiselled ones with tight lines but also profound complexity – a bountiful stonefruit fruitiness, white pepper-dried ginger-bright spice thing going on, clean light touch oak devoid of heavy tannins (hallelujah!), hot metal, hot gravel. Licorice root. Lime leaf. It’s actually got a rather mineralled edge to all that richness which acts as a fantastic foil. Maybe even a strand of something like sage. Absolutely salivating, and worth every dollar, because it’s not cheap.

 Palate: The balance is impeccable, everything in its place in exactly the right amounts, much like the nose. The stone fruit really shines through here, tart and sweet in parts. Wax,  dripping honey, that warm candied ginger effect, minerals galore all served on a hot tray. Tight but generous. Translates to the tongue so well.  Fabulous stuff.

 Finish: Long, slightly dusty, granite chips and chalk, quite a mineralled finish. No heavy wood, no wine, 46%, Bravissimo.

 

 

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This entry was posted on September 14, 2017 by in Clynelish and tagged .
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