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So much whisky, so little time | Singapore | Tasting Notes

Ardmore 16 you 1996 Douglas Laing OMC cask 8020 50%

Sorry for the long intermission, life got busy for a bit, but it’s not like I stopped drinking.

So, this is Ardmore. Rather famous for being the peated Speysider, and not peated as in a peated run here or there. Ardmore is by default peated, and it is the UNpeated runs that are the oddity. Unpeated Ardmore is called Ardlair, but I really agree with the prevailing view that it should be called Ardless. Another odd thing about Ardmore is that is was built by blenders for blends – Adam Teacher, son of William Teacher who gave his name to the Teacher’s blend. So you would be right in expecting there to be a lot of Ardmore in Teacher’s.

Ardmore_Distillery_-_geograph.org.uk_-_1275892

On the subject of odd things, which seems in no short supply at Ardmore, consider that from early on in the 70s, Ardmore was already one of the largest distilleries in Scotland with 8 stills and yet also one of the last distilleries to convert from direct heating (coal in this case) to steam heating in 2002. Note the steep decline of the lyne arms and pretty pots all in a row:

Ardmore stills (public image)

Is Ardmore post 2002 different? No says owners Beam. The distillery spent 7 months fiddling with the distillation to get the profile back where they want it, but to a puritan, that statement is itself is an unreserved yes.

ardmore-16-year-old-1996-cask-8020-old-malt-cask-douglas-laing-whisky

(Masterofmalt.com)

Nose  Nose: The peat used for Ardmore is different and it shows here. It is a matted black earth peat, with carrotseed and fibrous roots and mouldering mulch – and no maritime flavours at all. But its other face is not lacking either. Some oatiness, olive oil, sharp green tones , woody patchouli. Very nice.

Taste  Palate: Earthy and quite deep. Raw root vegetables, burning grass smoke, then softens into soft biscuits, touch of rounded fruits. Never does shake off this sappy broken leaves, and thin woodiness. Wild Scottish thicket.

Finish  Finish: Touch of smoke and dry grass.

Score90

 

Surprisingly complex at 16, and so was a 15 by Single Malts of Scotland I have. I do like Ardmore and hold it above many other common names you see on shelves. Try it out, but you must like some peat.

 

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This entry was posted on July 15, 2015 by in Ardmore and tagged .
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